Saltwater Pearls: Tahitian, Ayoka & South-Sea | Namaka Jewelry

by Joanne BRENT October 10, 2019

Saltwater Pearls: Tahitian, Ayoka & South-Sea | Namaka Jewelry

Saltwater Pearls: Tahitian, Ayoka & South-Sea

We recently discussed the differences between saltwater and freshwater pearls. However, the world of ocean “periculture” is simply fascinating. There are three major types of saltwater cultured pearls, Akoya, Tahitian, and South Sea. These share many of the same characteristics but, as is the case with natural pearls, each can look vastly different. This is especially true because each is sourced from a different species of oceanic oyster that can only grow one pearl at a time. Without further ado, here’s what you need to know about the different types of saltwater pearls.

Tahitian Pearls: The Mysterious

Cultured and harvested in the seas of French Polynesia, these Tahitian pearls are not uniform in shape. In fact, they can vary in interesting shapes like baroque to oval or even teardrops. These saltwater molluscs are also the species to produce the ever-mysterious “black pearls”.

Akoya Pearls: The Classic

Akoya pearls are saltwater grown in Japan, China and now India. These types of pearls are the well-recognized and loved for their white, round quality with high shine and luster. They have been the classic pearl of choice for over 100 years and are the traditional pearls every woman wants to own.

South-Sea Pearls: The Queen

Boasting beautiful shades of crisp white to luxurious gold (and everything in between), south-sea pearls are primarily cultured in the saltwaters surrounding Australia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. They tend to also be the largest of the saltwater pearls, often rendering them very valuable.  

Buying Authentic Tahitian Pearls

Tahitian pearls certainly are timeless. Whether you’re looking for stunning bridal jewelry or a classic pearl for an engagement ring, they’re universally adored. However, with so many kinds of pearls out there, it can make buying the right ones a challenge. This is why we’ve put together a quick shopping guide to help you out! Don’t hesitate to browse through our collections of real, natural pearls online and even speak to our in-store experts for any assistance.

 





Joanne BRENT
Joanne BRENT

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